The Art of Sibling Rivalry


My younger brother and I were born two years and seven months apart. That is a weird gap — it isn’t short enough for us to be best friends and it isn’t long enough for us to be “strangers.” Growing up, it seemed like we’d certainly head down similar paths. School was always first, followed closely by music. Of course we diverged slightly when I was interested in acting — he wouldn’t be caught dead on a stage in a (gasp) costume! But in general, we had similar life goals.

I went to Temple University (as I’m sure you’ve heard me proudly proclaim several times). My brother followed me to Temple during my senior year. He joined a fraternity — at my request — and started to make friends. All seemed dandy.

However, going into his junior year, I noticed that him and I weren’t as similar as I had thought. My senior year, I had taken 18 credits both semesters, had two internships and worked four part-time jobs. He was content taking 12 credits, playing guitar and occasionally hitting the library to chill with his bros. It became clear that school was no longer his forte and his heart wasn’t in it.

He approached me one day and dropped a bomb — “Cris, I’m going to join the Army.” Umm — excuse me? He spent the last three years in college and was now ready to throw it away? But as he and I argued our points, he started to convince me — why continue with something that he wasn’t passionate about? I helped him tell our parents and had him meet with my friend who is a recruiter.

The point of this post was to remind myself that you must ALWAYS follow your heart. You cannot excel at something for which you have no passion. Never thought he’d teach me anything (no offense, Tim) but he did without realizing it.

On Cloud 9…For Now


I finally got a call back for the interview that took place at the end of April (trust me, waiting that long to hear back was torturous). I will be the first to say… I. AM. ECSTATIC.

Judging by my level of excitement, you’d probably think they offered me the position. However, you’d be wrong. I scheduled a second interview for two weeks from tomorrow (yes, more waiting).

But something is very different about this time. While waiting for other interviewers to return my phone calls and emails since graduation, I found myself thinking about this position. I would just say to myself, “I’m just greedy, I want it all.” But now, when I look back at the past six weeks of “unemployment” during my post-grad status, I noticed that this position has been in the back of my mind the entire time. Not a day goes by where I don’t think about this position and how it can AND will change my life. I have even written several blog posts about it!

I can envision myself working with this franchise, forming relationships and enjoying the countless hours at the office, on the field or commuting to and from work. From the beginning of this blog, I have preached about doing what you love, and this is my passion.

Keep your fingers crossed for both myself and my friend (who is fighting for a similar position) and I will let you know when we get the position. <=== I have to keep a good attitude. “The Secret” says so.

We Were Made For Each Other

The College Grad’s Version of a Critical Decision


"To Know the Road Ahead, Ask Those Coming Back"

Since graduation I have had five interviews. I thought I was one of the lucky ones until I realized I will be having to make an extremely difficult decision in the upcoming weeks (if all goes as I hope and think it will).

OPTION A: Before graduation, I had interviewed with an NFL team for a position in community relations. “What could this position be,” you may ask. Aye, there’s the rub. It is an intern-level position. Now before you shudder in disbelief that I may be considering an internship position post-graduation, I need to let it be known that it will be paid. I do use the term “paid” loosely; it would be minimum wage, without benefits (bites finger). Yes. After four years, thousands of dollars and three unpaid internships, would the next step be to a paid internship? I’ve been teetering back and forth; the job description is me in a nutshell. Player appearances, media coverage, promotions, event planning…everything I love to do, and coincidentally, everything at which I excel.

OPTION B: I recently had two telephone interviews with a digital ad sales company in New York (if you don’t know me, New York is my promised land). My third interview is  tomorrow afternoon at the New York City satellite location. The company prides itself on the benefits offered by the 30-something executives. With the founder being just a little younger than 35, the company knows what is enticing to its younger-than-normal team;  it offers health, vision, dental and little perks like car washes and happy hours. The position for which I am interviewing isn’t necessarily in the field of public relations but the closely related and perhaps, more profitable, marketing and ad sales. This company is showing promise of growing into one of the world’s premiere digital ad sales firms, and perhaps I should hop on the tail of this comet while I have the chance.

But the question remains; is it better to take a salary position with benefits which is not necessarily in your field or a “paid” internship that promises of growth and demands all skills you’ve acquired during your collegiate career? To make it simple; a career for money or a gig for passion?